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London Fire Brigade: E-scooters and E-bikes fire warning

London Fire Brigade: E-scooters and E-bikes fire warning

We attended over 70 fires involving e-scooters and e-bikes in 2021

London Fire Brigade

Charging your e-bike or e-scooter

The majority of fires related to electric personal vehicles have happened in homes. These fires are often caused when charging batteries.

Reduce the risk of overheating

  • Batteries can get warm during their use. Allow them to cool down before attempting to re-charge.
  • Batteries should always be charged on hard flat surfaces where heat can dissipate.
  • Batteries can also pose a risk if they have been damaged, so try to ensure they are not getting knocked around while in use or while being carried.
  • Batteries should also never be exposed to extremes of temperature.

Follow the instructions

  • Always follow manufacturers’ instructions when charging 
  • Never leave it charging unattended or charge it while you are asleep.
  • You should always make sure you unplug your charger once it’s finished charging.
  • Always use the correct charger for your batteries and buy any replacements from a reputable seller.

Where to charge your batteries

  • Never block your escape route with e-bikes or e-scooters
  • Store and charge them somewhere away from a main through route or exit
  • Make sure you and your family have an escape plan in place in the event of a fire. Always call 999, never try to fight the fire yourself

Using your e-bikes or e-scooter

In 2021 Transport for London (TfL) banned e-scooters from London’s transport network. This is due to a number of fires on the network involving these vehicles. This means you’re unable to take your electric personal vehicles on any TfL service. You can read TfL’s full guidance on e-scooters on their site.

Not all personal electric vehicles, such as e-scooters and e-unicycles are road legal in the UK. This means you can be fined by the police for using them on the road in the UK. Always check to see if you can use your vehicle on public roads. 

Article taken from LFB website